Xu Hướng 3/2024 # Words And Phrases That Rhyme With “Strong”: Dong, Gong, Long, Mong, Pong, Prong, … # Top 7 Xem Nhiều

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Pure Rhymes – 55 rhymes

Words that have identical vowel-based rhyme sounds in the tonic syllable. Moreover, that tonic syllable must start with a different consonantal sound.

dong 

gong 

long 

mong 

pong 

prong 

rong 

song 

sprong 

stong 

thong 

throng 

tong 

wrong 

bong 

along 

belong 

lifelong 

prolong 

sarong 

yearlong 

Chong 

Cong 

DeLong 

Fong 

Hmong 

Hong 

Kong 

Ong 

Spong 

Truong 

Vietcong 

Wong 

Yong 

Zedong 

all along

come along

go along

keep plugging along

play along

right along

run along

string along

ding dong

before long

happy as the day is long

so long

buy for a song

for a song

swan song

get in wrong

get one wrong

go wrong

in the wrong

take one wrong

End Rhymes – 16 rhymes

Words that have a pure rhyme on their last syllable only.

Near Rhymes – 1943 rhymes

Words that “almost” rhyme on the vowel-based rhyme sound of the stressed syllable like: be/eat or maybe/shapely.

cost 

crossed 

frost 

glossed 

lost 

tossed 

accost 

defrost 

embossed 

exhaust 

Aust 

Lacoste 

keep one’s fingers crossed

keep your fingers crossed

jack frost

get lost

no love lost

corns 

horn’s 

horns 

mourns 

scorns 

thorns 

warns 

adorns 

Thorn’s 

by the horns

draw in one’s horns

grab the bulls by its horns

haul in one’s horns

lock horns

take the bull by its horns

take the bull by the horns

bed of thorns

“Go Pro” to see the next 82 near rhyme sets.

Mosaic Rhymes

Rhymes made up of more than one word. For instance, “jealous” and “tell us” or “shaky” and “make me.”

One-syllable words do not have mosaic rhymes.

Words And Phrases That Rhyme With “Stay Strong”: Furlong, Herlong, Dong, Gong, Long, M…

Pure Rhymes

Words that have identical vowel-based rhyme sounds in the tonic syllable. Moreover, that tonic syllable must start with a different consonantal sound.

There are no pure rhymes for “stay strong”.

End Rhymes – 73 rhymes

Words that have a pure rhyme on their last syllable only.

dong 

gong 

long 

mong 

pong 

prong 

rong 

song 

sprong 

stong 

strong 

thong 

throng 

tong 

wrong 

bong 

along 

belong 

lifelong 

prolong 

sarong 

yearlong 

Chong 

Cong 

DeLong 

Fong 

Hmong 

Hong 

Kong 

Ong 

Spong 

Truong 

Vietcong 

Wong 

Yong 

Zedong 

all along

come along

go along

keep plugging along

play along

right along

run along

string along

ding dong

before long

happy as the day is long

so long

buy for a song

for a song

swan song

come on strong

get in wrong

get one wrong

go wrong

in the wrong

take one wrong

Near Rhymes – 2 rhymes

Words that “almost” rhyme on the vowel-based rhyme sound of the stressed syllable like: be/eat or maybe/shapely.

Mosaic Rhymes – 34 rhymes

Rhymes made up of more than one word. For instance, “jealous” and “tell us” or “shaky” and “make me.”

a + gong

a + long

a + song

a + strong

a + thong

a + throng

a + wrong

away + long

clay + long

day + long

delay + long

display + strong

gay + song

gay + throng

lay + long

lay + strong

may + long

may + wrong

pay + long

play + long

pray + long

re + long

re + strong

re + wrong

say + long

say + wrong

stay + long

stay + strong

they + long

they + strong

they + throng

they + wrong

way + long

way + wrong

Conclusion Transition Words And Phrases

To help your students make their conclusion paragraphs a little more unique, it helps to provide a nuts-and-bolts lesson on conclusion transition words. You’ve probably already worked on general transition phrases as you broke down how to write a strong body paragraph, but conclusion transition words are easy to skip over! Try these tips to get your students ready to find another word for “in conclusion,” and you’ll have given them a useful skill for life.

Brainstorming Conclusion Transition Words

It’s always a good idea to see where your students are at when you start a new topic. Try starting with a brainstorming session to see if your budding writers can come up with conclusion transition words on their own. Get them all down on a piece of chart paper and hang it somewhere everyone will be able to see it when it comes time to write.

Research Conclusion Transition Words

If the brainstorming session was harder than you thought it would be, now’s the time to add some thesaurus work to your lesson plan. Have students work independently – or perhaps with a partner – to look up words related to “conclusion” and craft some more interesting conclusion transition words based on their findings. You can come back together as a whole group to add to your original brainstorming document or to make more polished classroom posters.

Printable Reference of Conclusion Transition Words

It’s also helpful to hand students a reference sheet of common conclusion transition words to make their essay writing easier. After all, you don’t want them to struggle and stress about getting that conclusion started when they should be focusing their energies on the content! You can make your own, or you can grab a quick printable worksheet of conclusion transition words to photocopy for your students to keep in their writing notebooks.

Examples of Conclusion Transition Words

Not sure if you’ve covered all the bases yet? Try adding these concluding phrases and conclusion transition words to your repertoire:

Conclusion Transition Words Sentence Examples

It’s also a good idea to share as many well written conclusions as you can with your students. Make this fun by adding in conclusion transition words to fairy tales, fables and other stories everyone knows:

In summary, Goldilocks was a very messy and very picky little girl.

Finally, the tortoise crossed the finish line to prove that “slow and steady” really does win the race.

All things considered, being locked in a castle with talking dishes and furniture may have been the best thing that ever happened to Belle.

In the final analysis, the third little pig was very generous when he allowed his lazy brothers to hide in his house made of bricks.

In Conclusion…

Once you have worked with your students on conclusion transition words to get them started on their conclusion paragraphs, it’s time to get writing! Pick some conclusion transition words, gather your thoughts and put pencil to paper. Remember, these lessons will help writers of all ages – and even you! – come up with some new ways to end a paper so you don’t sound like a broken record. Now that you know what to do, all that’s left is to write! (Or to get started on grading that stack of papers you collected from the newly minted essay writers in your classroom!)

40 Useful Words And Phrases For Top

To be truly brilliant, an essay needs to utilise the right language. You could make a great point, but if it’s not intelligently articulated, you almost needn’t have bothered.

Developing the language skills to build an argument and to write persuasively is crucial if you’re to write outstanding essays every time. In this article, we’re going to equip you with the words and phrases you need to write a top-notch essay, along with examples of how to utilise them.

It’s by no means an exhaustive list, and there will often be other ways of using the words and phrases we describe that we won’t have room to include, but there should be more than enough below to help you make an instant improvement to your essay-writing skills.

This article is suitable for native English speakers and those who are learning English at Oxford Royale Academy and are just taking their first steps into essay writing.

Let’s start by looking at language for general explanations of complex points.

1. In order to

Usage: “In order to” can be used to introduce an explanation for the purpose of an argument. Example: “In order to understand X, we need first to understand Y.”

2. In other words

Usage: Use “in other words” when you want to express something in a different way (more simply), to make it easier to understand, or to emphasise or expand on a point. Example: “Frogs are amphibians. In other words, they live on the land and in the water.”

3. To put it another way

Usage: This phrase is another way of saying “in other words”, and can be used in particularly complex points, when you feel that an alternative way of wording a problem may help the reader achieve a better understanding of its significance. Example: “Plants rely on photosynthesis. To put it another way, they will die without the sun.”

4. That is to say

Usage: “That is” and “that is to say” can be used to add further detail to your explanation, or to be more precise. Example: “Whales are mammals. That is to say, they must breathe air.”

5. To that end

Usage: Use “to that end” or “to this end” in a similar way to “in order to” or “so”. Example: “Zoologists have long sought to understand how animals communicate with each other. To that end, a new study has been launched that looks at elephant sounds and their possible meanings.”

Students often make the mistake of using synonyms of “and” each time they want to add further information in support of a point they’re making, or to build an argument. Here are some cleverer ways of doing this.

6. Moreover

Usage: Employ “moreover” at the start of a sentence to add extra information in support of a point you’re making. Example: “Moreover, the results of a recent piece of research provide compelling evidence in support of…”

7. Furthermore

Usage:This is also generally used at the start of a sentence, to add extra information. Example: “Furthermore, there is evidence to suggest that…”

8. What’s more

Usage: This is used in the same way as “moreover” and “furthermore”. Example: “What’s more, this isn’t the only evidence that supports this hypothesis.”

9. Likewise

Usage: Use “likewise” when you want to talk about something that agrees with what you’ve just mentioned. Example: “Scholar A believes X. Likewise, Scholar B argues compellingly in favour of this point of view.”

10. Similarly

Usage: Use “similarly” in the same way as “likewise”. Example: “Audiences at the time reacted with shock to Beethoven’s new work, because it was very different to what they were used to. Similarly, we have a tendency to react with surprise to the unfamiliar.”

11. Another key thing to remember

Usage: Use the phrase “another key point to remember” or “another key fact to remember” to introduce additional facts without using the word “also”. Example: “As a Romantic, Blake was a proponent of a closer relationship between humans and nature. Another key point to remember is that Blake was writing during the Industrial Revolution, which had a major impact on the world around him.”

12. As well as

Usage: Use “as well as” instead of “also” or “and”. Example: “Scholar A argued that this was due to X, as well as Y.”

13. Not only… but also

Usage: This wording is used to add an extra piece of information, often something that’s in some way more surprising or unexpected than the first piece of information. Example: “Not only did Edmund Hillary have the honour of being the first to reach the summit of Everest, but he was also appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire.”

14. Coupled with

Usage: Used when considering two or more arguments at a time. Example: “Coupled with the literary evidence, the statistics paint a compelling view of…”

15. Firstly, secondly, thirdly…

Usage: This can be used to structure an argument, presenting facts clearly one after the other. Example: “There are many points in support of this view. Firstly, X. Secondly, Y. And thirdly, Z.

16. Not to mention/to say nothing of

Usage: “Not to mention” and “to say nothing of” can be used to add extra information with a bit of emphasis. Example: “The war caused unprecedented suffering to millions of people, not to mention its impact on the country’s economy.”

When you’re developing an argument, you will often need to present contrasting or opposing opinions or evidence – “it could show this, but it could also show this”, or “X says this, but Y disagrees”. This section covers words you can use instead of the “but” in these examples, to make your writing sound more intelligent and interesting.

17. However

Usage: Use “however” to introduce a point that disagrees with what you’ve just said. Example: “Scholar A thinks this. However, Scholar B reached a different conclusion.”

18. On the other hand

Usage: Usage of this phrase includes introducing a contrasting interpretation of the same piece of evidence, a different piece of evidence that suggests something else, or an opposing opinion. Example: “The historical evidence appears to suggest a clear-cut situation. On the other hand, the archaeological evidence presents a somewhat less straightforward picture of what happened that day.”

19. Having said that

Usage: Used in a similar manner to “on the other hand” or “but”. Example: “The historians are unanimous in telling us X, an agreement that suggests that this version of events must be an accurate account. Having said that, the archaeology tells a different story.”

20. By contrast/in comparison

Usage: Use “by contrast” or “in comparison” when you’re comparing and contrasting pieces of evidence. Example: “Scholar A’s opinion, then, is based on insufficient evidence. By contrast, Scholar B’s opinion seems more plausible.”

21. Then again

Usage: Use this to cast doubt on an assertion. Example: “Writer A asserts that this was the reason for what happened. Then again, it’s possible that he was being paid to say this.”

22. That said

Usage: This is used in the same way as “then again”. Example: “The evidence ostensibly appears to point to this conclusion. That said, much of the evidence is unreliable at best.”

23. Yet

Usage: Use this when you want to introduce a contrasting idea. Example: “Much of scholarship has focused on this evidence. Yet not everyone agrees that this is the most important aspect of the situation.”

Sometimes, you may need to acknowledge a shortfalling in a piece of evidence, or add a proviso. Here are some ways of doing so.

24. Despite this

Usage: Use “despite this” or “in spite of this” when you want to outline a point that stands regardless of a shortfalling in the evidence. Example: “The sample size was small, but the results were important despite this.”

25. With this in mind

Usage: Use this when you want your reader to consider a point in the knowledge of something else. Example: “We’ve seen that the methods used in the 19th century study did not always live up to the rigorous standards expected in scientific research today, which makes it difficult to draw definite conclusions. With this in mind, let’s look at a more recent study to see how the results compare.”

26. Provided that

Usage: This means “on condition that”. You can also say “providing that” or just “providing” to mean the same thing. Example: “We may use this as evidence to support our argument, provided that we bear in mind the limitations of the methods used to obtain it.”

27. In view of/in light of

Usage: These phrases are used when something has shed light on something else. Example: “In light of the evidence from the 2013 study, we have a better understanding of…”

28. Nonetheless

Usage: This is similar to “despite this”. Example: “The study had its limitations, but it was nonetheless groundbreaking for its day.”

29. Nevertheless

Usage: This is the same as “nonetheless”. Example: “The study was flawed, but it was important nevertheless.”

30. Notwithstanding

Usage: This is another way of saying “nonetheless”. Example: “Notwithstanding the limitations of the methodology used, it was an important study in the development of how we view the workings of the human mind.”

Good essays always back up points with examples, but it’s going to get boring if you use the expression “for example” every time. Here are a couple of other ways of saying the same thing.

31. For instance

Example: “Some birds migrate to avoid harsher winter climates. Swallows, for instance, leave the UK in early winter and fly south…”

32. To give an illustration

Example: “To give an illustration of what I mean, let’s look at the case of…”

When you want to demonstrate that a point is particularly important, there are several ways of highlighting it as such.

33. Significantly

Usage: Used to introduce a point that is loaded with meaning that might not be immediately apparent. Example: “Significantly, Tacitus omits to tell us the kind of gossip prevalent in Suetonius’ accounts of the same period.”

34. Notably

Usage: This can be used to mean “significantly” (as above), and it can also be used interchangeably with “in particular” (the example below demonstrates the first of these ways of using it). Example: “Actual figures are notably absent from Scholar A’s analysis.”

35. Importantly

Usage: Use “importantly” interchangeably with “significantly”. Example: “Importantly, Scholar A was being employed by X when he wrote this work, and was presumably therefore under pressure to portray the situation more favourably than he perhaps might otherwise have done.”

You’ve almost made it to the end of the essay, but your work isn’t over yet. You need to end by wrapping up everything you’ve talked about, showing that you’ve considered the arguments on both sides and reached the most likely conclusion. Writing a compelling conclusion is just one of the skills you’ll learn as part of our essay writing courses for 13-15-year-olds and academic writing for 16-18-year-olds . Here are some words and phrases to help you.

36. In conclusion

Usage: Typically used to introduce the concluding paragraph or sentence of an essay, summarising what you’ve discussed in a broad overview. Example: “In conclusion, the evidence points almost exclusively to Argument A.”

37. Above all

Usage: Used to signify what you believe to be the most significant point, and the main takeaway from the essay. Example: “Above all, it seems pertinent to remember that…”

38. Persuasive

Usage: This is a useful word to use when summarising which argument you find most convincing. Example: “Scholar A’s point – that Constanze Mozart was motivated by financial gain – seems to me to be the most persuasive argument for her actions following Mozart’s death.”

39. Compelling

Usage: Use in the same way as “persuasive” above. Example: “The most compelling argument is presented by Scholar A.”

40. All things considered

Persuasive Words & Phrases In Writing

For instance

For example

Namely

Such as

Thus

In the instance of

To illustrate

Here’s an example of using persuasive words and phrases to introduce evidence:

Oranges make great juice. For instance, research shows that more Americans drink orange juice with breakfast than any other drink.

Solid persuasive writing gives the reader information that may convince them to agree with you. Offering suggestions is an effective tool in persuasive writing to encourage readers to listen to your argument, such as:

Keeping in mind

Therefore

To this end, look at this example:

Keeping in mind the evidence gathered by ”so-and-so”, it seems smart to add a daily mug of coffee to your routine to keep your blood pressure at optimal levels.

Cohesive persuasive essays seamlessly transition from one paragraph or idea to the next. The best way to do that is through transition phrases that help you build from one logical point to the next. These transition phrases are perfect for any type of persuasive writing:

Furthermore

Besides that

Equally as important

Similarly

Likewise

However

Consider this example:

After the birds migrated from Alabama, it was shown that warmer weather attracted the birds to the lake. Likewise, the lake’s optimal microflora balance provided superior nutrition compared to other lakes in the region.

The key to solid persuasive writing is the ability to take evidence that contradicts your argument to bolster your credibility. Furthermore, a smart persuasive essay will use opposing information to lead into evidence that supports the writer’s argument. Here are words and phrases that help you do that:

In spite of

Instead

Nevertheless

On the other hand

Despite

Here’s an example:

Despite the study that showed coffee elevates blood pressure, study 1 and study 2 demonstrated solid conclusions that coffee does in fact reduce stress levels that may impact blood pressure.

Once you get to the end of your argument, you will want to finish strong. The following phrases will help you write a strong conclusion for your argument:

As a result of

So

Due to

Finally

Because of this

Here’s an example of a solid concluding remark:

Due to the massive amount of research on orange juice and its benefits, orange juice should be consumed every morning.

Persuasive Words And Phrases (And How To Use Them)

When it comes to assembling persuasive words for copywriting, like any other construction job, you need to rely on your skills, experience, and toolbox.

The toolbox of the writer is filled with words.

In defining what I believe is a critical element of effective copywriting, I’ll make my case by amending the famous quote from Animal Farm:

“All words are equal, but some words are more equal than others.”

And there are certain power words that hold more sway over our decision-making process than others. You might be surprised to find that these “power words” don’t seem … well, all that powerful.

This speaks to just how damned efficient they are. Simple language is crystal-clear, as we’ve learned from Brian’s article How to Write like Hemingway. And these compelling words make just what you want your reader to do clear.

Warning: I can’t stress enough, though — just as in the application of writing headlines that work — you must understand why these words are persuasive. You can’t forget to use them in the contexts that make sense for your audience and your business. If you just start slapping them on every piece of content you create for no apparent reason, you’ll quickly see just how unpersuasive they can be.

There, you’ve been warned. Now, let’s get on with the show …

How do you make a sentence more persuasive?

Before you can make a sentence more persuasive, you have to intimately know who you’re talking to in your content and copy. That’s why these words don’t work if you just blindly start using them. You’ll actually combine them with your research about your prospects.

Making a sentence more compelling is all about adding persuasive language to otherwise vague sentences. The more specific you can be, the more the reader will feel like you’ve written your content specifically for them. Then you sprinkle in known persuasive words to keep your reader hooked.

Ready to check out top persuasive words and sentences?

The 5 most persuasive words in the English language for copywriting

You might be surprised to learn that the most persuasive words in the English language are actually quite simple. Simple, but highly effective.

The persuading words list below (along with studies related to their power) will show you how to speak more persuasively to your audience.

1. You

There’s an often-cited study in the copywriting world. It’s about a piece of Yale research that reveals “You” to be the #1 power word out of a supposed 12.

Despite the fact that the study likely never happened, I have some actual research that reveals the power of invoking the self.

As it turns out, while people might like the word “you,” it is guaranteed that that they love reading their own name much more.

According to research examining brain activation, few things light us up quite like seeing our own names in print or on the screen. Our names are intrinsically tied to our self-perception and make up a massive part of our identity. No surprise then, that we become more engaged and even more trusting of a message in which our name appears.

Research has shown that we will gladly pay more for personalization. So, isn’t it about time you start getting personal with your customers?

However, there is one small problem with this finding …

Writing general web copy with name utilization in mind isn’t usually possible. But by capitalizing on the power of permission marketing, you can adapt this strategy easily. Emails are greatly enhanced when they start off messages with a customer’s name.

If you maintain a variety of separate lists for your products (and you should), make sure you’re grabbing a first name. This way, your broadcasts can trigger that personal aspect with customers.

2. Free

Everybody loves free.

People love free stuff so much they’ll actually make different choices, even when the respective value of the item or service remains the same.

Dan Ariely revealed this startling fact in his book Predictably Irrational. He examined a very unusual “battle” between Lindt chocolate truffles and Hershey’s Kisses.

To test the power of the word “free” in relation to concrete value, the study first asked people to choose between a 1-cent Hershey Kiss or a 15-cent Lindt truffle. (That’s about half of the truffle’s actual value, and Lindt is generally considered a richer, superior chocolate).

Here were the results:

In other words, tastes were found to be very much in favor for the truffle. I mean, who’s going to pass up a deal, right?

Later though, another random group of subjects seemingly flipped on their opinion of these two treats. Ariely revealed that when the price was reduced by one cent for both brands (meaning the Kiss was now free), people altered their choices drastically.

With the new prices, here were the results:

Although in the first test it appears we simply can’t pass up a deal, as it turns out, we really can’t pass up a steal. Although the relation in prices remained the same (a 14 cent difference between the two), people chose the Kiss far more often when it was free.

Ariely points to loss aversion (our disdain for losing out on things) and our natural instinct to go after “low hanging fruit” as the reasons why we are so susceptible to snatching up free stuff.

Use free only when it makes sense, and only in the right context

There’s a certain inherent danger in trumpeting free things. Having something for free will attract more people. But that will most certainly include a fair share of “bargain hunters” who aren’t likely to turn into the superstar customers who really grow your business.

Emphasizing the “freeness” of your free guides, courses, information, support, etc., can go a long way in attracting attention. On Sparring Mind, I emphasize the fact that my newsletter is “free to join,” because although most marketers understand this, many folks don’t quite understand what it means to subscribe.

Conversely, you should use minimal pricing to keep out those barnacle customers who aren’t ideal long-term buyers, or who aren’t truly suited for your flagship offerings.

3. Because

In a study from the classic book Influence by Robert Cialdini, tests were conducted on requests from a person in a hurry to use an in-office copy machine. The tests examined how different requests might affect people’s willingness to allow this person to “cut” in line.

In the first test, the participant simply stated:

“Excuse me, I have 5 pages. May I use the Xerox machine?”

In this scenario, around 60% of people allowed him to cut in line and use the machine first.

In the next scenario, the request was slightly tweaked. This time the participant said:

“I have 5 pages. May I use the Xerox machine, because I am in a rush?”

Did you see the ever-so-subtle difference between the two?

Let’s break down this experiment with one of the most persuasive words.

Not only was the request only minimally changed, but the “because” (his reason) was barely a reason at all! “Because I’m in a rush” wouldn’t stand up as a good excuse for most of us, right? Isn’t a majority of the working world in a rush?

Despite what we might like to believe, around 94% of people allowed him to cut in line this time! If you think that’s strange, check out the request used in the 3rd and final test:

“Excuse me, I have 5 pages. May I use the Xerox machine because I have to make copies?”

That went from having a barely passable reason to absolutely no reason at all for letting the man cut. In spite of this, 93% of people let him cut on this third trial. That’s only a 1% drop from when he had a weak reason (“I’m in a rush”) and a 33% improvement vs. the first test.

According to Cialdini:

“A well-known principle of human behavior says that when we ask someone to do us a favor we will be more successful if we provide a reason. People simply like to have reasons for what they do.”

Here’s the bottom line

Many companies are proud of the features that their product (or service) can offer. That’s fine, but you have to remember that when you’re focusing on writing persuasive copy, it all comes down to answering your customer’s #1 question:

What’s in it for me?

Although “because” may appear to have some sort of brainwashing effect on people at Xerox machines, it’s only really a matter of reasoning. Even giving weak reasons have been shown to be more persuasive than giving no reason at all.

Only trumpet features and product traits you’re proud of when they help make your point. Use them to create an incentive for customers to take action. And use “because” when pointing out these compelling reasons, but don’t rely on it as a crutch.

4. Instantly

Delayed gratification is an important subject among neuroscientists. Many famous studies (such as the Stanford marshmallow experiment) showcase how being able to delay rewards to a later date is a skill needed to become successful. (I know very few entrepreneurs who would argue against that.)

This interests us as marketers because it reveals an interesting aspect of human nature …

We want things yesterday!

Several MRI studies have shown just how fired up our mid-brain gets when we envision instant rewards. It’s our frontal cortex that’s activated when it comes to waiting for something (that’s a no-no for sales).

Words like “instant,” “immediately,” or even “fast” are triggers for flipping the switch on that mid-brain activity.

For those in the physical products or services business, using persuasive words and phrases to remind customers that they’ll receive their product quickly (or someone will get in touch with them ASAP) can go a long way. It can be the gentle push they need to buy.

We’ve seen how even “tightwad customers” can be swayed. These subtle changes in language to create persuasion sentences insinuate fast pain removal. It’s a reliable tactic for converting more prospects into customers as long as you follow the one golden rule …

Always deliver on your promises

And, whenever possible, overdeliver.

This is an area where many business get too optimistic. Although it’s smart to emphasis these instant rewards, it’s also always a good idea to under-promise and over-deliver. Be sure you can actually follow through on your promises, or you may end up with a “tribe” that hates your guts.

5. New

This one almost seems paradoxical.

According to neuroimaging research, we actually respond more favorably to recognized brands, and can have a hefty amount of disdain for any drastic changes. (Remember New Coke? Oh, the horror …)

On the other hand, it’s long been known that novelty plays an incredibly important role in activating our brains’ reward centers and in keeping us content with our products.

“Newness” is important to products, especially because research has shown that they age far more quickly than “experiential” purchases. (In other words, you’ll hate your new headphones in two years, but that concert you went to five years ago probably aged in your mind like a fine wine.)

How can you achieve a zen-like balance against these two contradictory sides of the same word?

The important things to consider here are which parts of your business generate trust, and which parts generate utility. It’s your brand that creates trust. And as the saying goes, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

Your products however are what customers get utility out of. Stagnant offerings are your first class ticket to an abysmally bored user base.

Your core brand elements like your unique selling proposition, dazzling customer service, and quality offering in the marketplace should be approached with excessive caution if things are going well.

With your products, it’s far easier to excite customers with new features and polish. Even if things don’t work out perfectly, a majority of customers will appreciate innovation attempts over no progression at all.

New fixes to old problems, new features and improvements, a fresh new design, or even new ways of getting your message out there are all essential. They keep customers “on their toes,” without losing the trust that has cemented you as an awesome brand in their mind.

Powerful, persuasive phrases and sentences

We just covered a lot, so take all the time you need to study those lessons.

When you’re ready to keep going, here are 20 more trigger words and phrases to supercharge your copy at the exact right moment when you need to connect with your reader.

To introduce your topic

Picture this …

Although it’s commonly believed …

When was the last time you …?

I’m sure you’ve heard of [blank], but …

Ready to discover a new way to …?

To make a point

Also …

In other words …

Therefore …

Supporting evidence shows …

I reached this conclusion after finding …

To support your point

For example …

Especially in this case …

In fact …

According to this study …

Independent test results show …

To end your case

In conclusion …

To wrap things up …

As you understand by now …

Try [blank] for yourself, if you want to see similar results.

Got it?

Now it’s your turn to experiment with persuasive copywriting words …

You know your audience better than anyone else. So, what type of persuasive language strikes a chord with your prospects?

Keep digging deeper and experimenting to find out how to connect with more people who are the perfect fit for your products or services.

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