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ARCHIVED: In Microsoft Word, how do I justify text on a page?

This content has been archived , and is no longer maintained by Indiana University. Information here may no longer be accurate, and links may no longer be available or reliable.

To space text evenly on the page in Microsoft Word, follow the appropriate instructions below.

On this page:

Changing the vertical alignment

Word 2010 and 2007 for Windows

From the

Page Layout

tab, open the Page Setup... dialog box (using the button in the lower right corner of the Page Setup group).

Select the

Layout

tab.

In the “Vertical alignment:” box, select

Justified

, and

Back to top

Word for Mac OS X

From the

Format

menu, select

Document…

.

Select the

Layout

tab.

From the

Vertical alignment

menu, select

Back to top

Changing the horizontal alignment

Note: Because the last line of text in a paragraph is often shorter than the other lines, it may not appear to be justified. To justify the last line in a justified paragraph, place the insertion point at the end of the last line, and then press Shift-Enter (Shift-Return on a Mac). Use the Enter key on the main keyboard, not on the keypad. This will insert a soft return (i.e., a non-paragraph-ending return). Be aware that justifying a very short line of text may look odd because of the large amount of space that will be created between the words.

Back to top

Word 2010 and 2007 for Windows and Word 2011 for Mac

Select the text you want to justify.

(  ) in the “Paragraph” group*.

Back to top

Word 2008 and earlier for Mac

Select the text you want to justify.

(  )*.

Back to top

*Alternatively, after selecting the text and select Paragraph. In the Paragraph dialog box, select the Indents and Spacing tab and, from the Alignment drop-down list, select Justified.

The above instructions were adapted from the following articles:

How Do I… Create And Format Tables In Word 2003?

This article was originally published on January 1, 2006.

If you’re a regular reader on TechRepublic, you may have seen my series covering various features in Microsoft Excel. While I am finished with that particular series (unless you send ideas for things you’d like to see, of course!), I will be tying this new series -all about Word-in with Excel fairly tightly.

That said, I won’t be doing much integrating with Excel in this particular article, which focuses on tables in Microsoft Word.

A little about this series

I mentioned above that tables are useful for a number of purposes. To that end, I will focus on two common uses of tables after providing an introduction:

How tables work

Using tables to create professional-looking forms

A lot about tables

The tables feature is so useful and popular in Word that Microsoft has devoted an entire menu ( Figure A) to this feature.

Over the course of this three-article series, we’ll cover every option on this menu.

Into this grid, you can put anything you like: text, numbers, pictures — whatever goes into Word will go into a table, too.

Creating a table

When you use the Insert Table button, you get a miniature grid. Using this grid, you tell Word how large you would like your table. In Figure C, a table that is three columns wide and two rows deep would be created. If you make a mistake with the number of rows and columns, don’t worry too much about it. You can always change it later.

In Figure D, notice that the dialog box tells you exactly how many rows and columns will be created for your new table — in this case, five columns and two rows. If you go this route, again, don’t worry if you make a mistake.

For example, rather than the usual row and column format, you could create a table that looks something like the one shown in Figure E.

Navigating your table Adding and deleting rows and columns

It’s easy to add rows to the end of your table, but what if you need to sneak something in between two rows you already have, or you need to add a column? What about deleting a row or column? No problem.

Shortcuts for adding and deleting rows and columns Formatting your table

Just like everything else in Word, your table can be formatted with different fonts, colors, line styles, and more. And even after your table is initially created, you can add and remove borders to create a custom table like the one you saw in Figure E.

Changing the line weight, color, and style

Most tables have some kind of grid. But in Word, you can keep the table and remove the grid, change the grid line style to some other type, and change the color of the lines altogether.

On the toolbar ( Figure I), the four options to the right of the Eraser button handle the line styles in your table.

Figure K below shows you an example of what different borders might look like in your table.

Changing the alignment in each cell

You can also change the position of the text in each individual cell in your table. In some cells, you might want the text centered both horizontally and vertically, while in another cell, you might want the text aligned at the bottom-right corner. This is where the cell alignment options come in ( Figure L).

Using this drop-down list, you can quickly change the position of text in your table. Take a look at Figure M to see an example of what you can do. Figure M shows you all of the available alignment options.

Distribute rows and columns

Are you a neat freak? Or do you just want to make sure that your table looks professional? One way you can do that is to make sure your rows and columns are sized appropriately. For example, if you’re showing monthly budget information, your column widths for each month should look the same rather than being all different sizes. Take a look at Figure N to see what I mean.

It’s actually easy to make your table look neat: Use the Distribute Rows Evenly and Distribute Columns Evenly buttons on the toolbar ( Figure O).

You can also manually change the width of a column or the height of a row ( Figure P). When you’re in your table, take a look at both your horizontal and your vertical ruler bars. Each one is broken up with a control that just happens to be at the break point for each row and column.

AutoFormat

From this window, you can peruse the multitude of styles provided by Word, make a modification to one of the templates, or even create your own style. The AutoFormat option allows you to specify which areas you will apply to your table. For example, if you don’t have a header row on your table, you might now want to have the special boldfaced heading text, so you can deselect the Heading Rows option. Figure R shows you the results of using AutoFormat on the mini-budget table. Note that every other line is shaded in this example. Doing that manually on a large table could take quite some time.

Formatting options

Creating, customizing, and formatting tables in Word is largely a function of the specialized Tables And Borders toolbar. With Word, you can create tables of practically any size and shape.

How To Vertically Align Text In Microsoft Word

What to Know

To center text in Word, use the Vertical alignment menu.

The Vertical Alignment menu also controls Top, Justified, and Bottom text alignment.

To center text in Word for only part of the document, highlight what you want to center before choosing Vertical Alignment.

This article explains how to center text in Word. Instructions apply to Word for Microsoft 365, Word 2024, Word 2024, Word 2013, Word 2010, Word 2007, and Word 2003.

How to Vertically Align Text in Word

When you want to position text in a section of a document relative to the top and bottom margins, use vertical alignment.

To reflect a change in the vertical alignment, the document page or pages must be only partially full of text.

For Microsoft Word 2024, 2024, 2013, 2010, and 2007

Open the Word document in which you want to vertically align the text.

Go to the Layout tab (or Page Layout, depending on the version of Word).

In the Page Setup group, select the Page Setup dialog launcher (which is located in the lower-right corner of the group).

In the Page Setup dialog box, choose the Layout tab.

In the Page section, select the Vertical alignment drop-down arrow and choose either Top, Center, Justified, or Bottom.

If you choose Justified, the text is spread out evenly from top to bottom.

Select OK.

Your text will now be aligned the way you selected.

For Word 2003

To vertically align text in Microsoft Word 2003:

Select File.

Choose Page Setup.

In the Page Setup dialog box, select Layout.

Select the Vertical alignment drop-down arrow and choose either Top, Center, Justified, or Bottom.

Select OK.

Vertically Align Part of a Word Document

When you use the steps above, the default condition is to change the vertical alignment of the entire Microsoft Word document. If you want to change the alignment of only part of the document, select the text you want to vertically align.

Here’s how to vertically align part of a document:

Select the text you want to vertically align.

Go to the Layout tab (or Page Layout, depending on the version of Word).

In the Page Setup group, select the Page Setup dialog launcher (it’s located in the lower-right corner of the group).

In the Page Setup dialog box, choose the Layout tab.

In the Page section, select the Vertical alignment drop-down arrow and choose an alignment.

In the Preview section, select the Apply to drop-down arrow and choose Selected text.

Select OK to apply the alignment to the selected text.

Any text before or after the selection retains the existing alignment choices.

If you don’t select text prior to performing the alignment selection, the Selected text preference can only be applied from the cursor’s current location to the end of the document.

To make this work, position the cursor, then:

Go to the Layout tab (or Page Layout, depending on the version of Word).

In the Page Setup group, select the Page Setup dialog launcher (which is located in the lower-right corner of the group).

In the Page Setup dialog box, choose the Layout tab.

In the Page section, select the Vertical alignment drop-down arrow and choose an alignment.

In the Preview section, select the Apply to drop-down arrow and choose This point forward.

Select OK to apply the alignment to the text.

How Do I… Create And Format Tables In Word 2007?

This article is also available as a TechRepublic download and as a TechRepublic gallery.

Word 2007, part of the Microsoft Office 2007 suite, has many built-in features that can enhance your documents and the manner in which you communicate information to your audience. One of the most common and yet still useful features in this category is the table format. Creating and formatting tables in Word 2007 is different from how you did it Word 2003, but you may actually find it easier.

Create a table

You can also choose one of the first two items from the list shown in Figure B and insert a table by way of the Insert Table dialog box ( Figure D) or by drawing a table.

Several pre-made table templates are available on the Insert tab listed under the Quick Tables item ( Figure F). You can insert calendars, double tables, and tabular lists, to name just a few.

Format a table

Once you create a table and populate it with data, the next step is to format the table. Proper formatting will help your table convey just the information you want it to.

Design Ribbon under Table Tools

As part of the Office 2007 interface, additional tabs and menu items are revealed to the user when they are needed. In this case, a new high-level tab, Table Tools, is added to the interface whenever you are interacting with a table element inside a Word document. The two tabs under Table Tools contain all of the various formatting tools you need to customize your table.

In Word 2007, whenever you are inside a table within your document, the Ribbon interface changes to the Design Ribbon under Table Tools ( Figure G).

From the Design Ribbon, you can set format characteristics like header row, first column, shading, borders, and color. You can use one of the predefined styles listed on the Ribbon or you can create something on your own. These format settings can be applied to a specific cell, row, column, or to the entire table.

The Design Ribbon also includes a section where you can set the type of line you would like to use, the point size of that line, and the color of that line ( Figure H).

In another area on the Design Ribbon under Table Tools, you can set shading and place or remove border lines. The number of choices offers you a tremendous amount of formatting flexibility ( Figure I).

Layout Ribbon under Table Tools

Additional formatting options are available on the Layout Ribbon under Table Tools, shown in Figure J.

Among the more important formatting decisions you will have to make about your table is how to align it on the page and how to space the cells within the table itself.

Aligning individual cells, rows, columns, and the entire table can all be accomplished with the buttons located in the Alignment section of the Layout Ribbon (Figure J) under Table Tools. You can also change text direction and cell margins in this area of the Ribbon ( Figure L).

The Layout Ribbon (Figure J) under Table Tools is also where you can insert rows and columns into your table, either at the ends or in between existing rows and columns.

Table styles

Microsoft Office 2007 includes numerous themes and templates for each of the applications in the suite, including Word 2007 tables. One of the features that differentiates Office 2007 from Office 2003 is the ability to preview these templates and themes before you commit to them. Figure N shows a simple table with basic formatting. Holding the mouse over the Table Styles shown on the Design Ribbon (Figure G) under Table Tools will preview what the table would like if that pre-made style were applied ( Figure O).

Wrap up

As you can see, the way you create and format tables in Word 2007 is different from the way you performed the same task in Office 2003 and earlier. However, the Ribbon interface actually makes sense when you are working on tables in Word. It may take some getting used to, but I think in the long run, the Ribbon will be seen as a beneficial feature and not a drawback.

How To Insert, View, Or Delete Section (& Page) Breaks In Microsoft Word

When you’re working on a long document, separating it into different parts makes it much easier to navigate. Microsoft Word eases your workflow by letting you define document breaks, namely section and page breaks.

As you’ll see in this article by defining section and page breaks you can apply specific formatting elements in different parts of your document. You’ll also have better control over pagination.

Read on to learn how to use section and page breaks in Word to make your document more visually appealing and easier for readers to make their way around. Finally, we’ll show you some great sources for professionally designed Word templates.

Understanding Section and Page Breaks

Section and page breaks are types of breaks or partitions in a Word document. In this section, you’ll learn some basics:

1. Microsoft Word Section Break vs Page Break

A page break is a partition in the text of the document. At a page break, the succeeding text is automatically placed on top of a new page.

But, with a section break for Word the text is partitioned – along with the formatting associated with it:

page numbers

margins

headers and footers

paper size and/or orientation

Also, a Microsoft Word section break may or may not begin on a new page (more on that below).

2. Why Use Microsoft Section and Page Breaks?

Section and page breaks are useful for partitioning different parts of a document, especially a long one.

In a book, you’d use section breaks to divide it into chapters as well as delineate the front matter from the back matter. The title page, copyright page, table of contents, individual chapters, index, etc., would be separate sections.

For example, you usually want a new chapter of a book (or similar) document to begin on a new page. This is when a page break is most useful.

A section break for MS Word is useful for visually distinguishing parts of a document. An example of where you might use a section break is in a proposal where you want the summary to have a different layout. In this case, the summary section could have its own header, footer, and margins that are different from the rest of the document.

By using section breaks, each chapter can have a different running header, including the chapter title.

Microsoft Word Section breaks also let you use lower case numbers for page numbers on the introduction of the book and Arabic numerals on the rest of the pages.

Similarly, a section break in Microsoft Word lets you use a two-column format in the index section and a single column everywhere else.

You’ll also want to use section and page breaks when you want to control the pagination of your document. For example, the first page of your document may be a cover page. But you don’t want the cover page to be page 1 of your document. By inserting a section break after the cover page, you can make the next page be page 1.

You accomplish these results by inserting different types of section and page breaks in Word.

3. Types of Microsoft Word Section Breaks

There are four types of section breaks in MS Word:

Next Page. This type of section break forces the text to the right of the cursor to a new section on the following page. All the formatting associated with the text is carried through to the new section as well.

Continuous. A continuous section break creates a new section but keeps the text on the same page. This means two different sections can have their own formatting yet remain on the same page.

Odd Page. This kind of section break moves the text to the right of the cursor to the top of the next odd-numbered page. If you’re on page 3, for example, and you insert an Odd Page Section Break, the next section will start on top of page 5 (page 4 will be blank). Book chapters usually begin on the next odd page of the book.

Even Page. An Even Page section break moves the text to the right of the cursor to the top of the next even-numbered page. So, if you’re on page 6 and you insert an Even Page Section Break, the new section will begin on page 8 (leaving page 7 blank).

4. Types of Page Breaks

As for Microsoft Word page breaks, there are two kinds:

Simple Page Breaks. A simple page break moves text to the right of the cursor to the top of the next page.

Column Breaks. If your document is broken up into columns, a column break moves text to the right of the cursor to the top of the next column.

How to View Existing Breaks in an MS Word Doc

By default, section and page breaks are invisible in Word. You can only see their effects. You’ll see changes in formatting and pagination for each section. That’s because these breaks don’t appear when the document is printed.

How to Insert Section Breaks in Your Word Docs

To insert a page or section break, place the cursor where you want one section/page to end and the next section/page to begin.

How to Remove/Delete Section and Page Breaks in Word

To remove a section or page break in Word, first display all the breaks.

When you delete a section break, the text in the section adopts the formatting of the next section.

Tips for Using Section and Page Breaks in MS Word

Are you just getting comfortable with using Microsoft Word section and page breaks? Here are some extra tips to help you use them effectively:

1. Keep Your Section Breaks to a Minimum

Insert a section break in Word only when you have to (see above for when it’s a good idea to do so). Having more sections than necessary makes it more difficult to make global changes to your document, because you’d have to manually make those changes in each section.

2. Pay Attention to Which Section You’re In

If you’ve divided your document into sections, always be aware of what section you’re in when you make formatting changes. That’s because these changes will apply only to the section you’re currently in – that’s the section where your cursor is. If you want to make a formatting change to apply to the whole document, select the entire document first before making your changes.

3. Microsoft Word May Change a Continuous Section Break to the Other Section Break Types

You may be surprised that your continuous section break has been converted into a different type of section break. This happens when you’ve got a continuous section break. Then, in the next section, you try to apply a different header/footer, pagination, margins, or page size and orientation. Those formatting changes require a page break. And so, Word will automatically change the section break type to one that results in a page break.

Streamline Your Microsoft Word Workflow With Templates

There are other ways to streamline your MS Word workflow. One of them is using premium Word templates, like the ones you’ll find at Envato. Premium templates for Microsoft Word are created by professional designers to provide impressive layouts. These templates are customizable with your content, images, and branding. You can also adjust the design and layout as you please.

Or, go to GraphicRiver for Microsoft Word templates and other creative elements on a pay-per-use basis. It’s a terrific source for one-off projects.

Make Your Document Easier to Read and Navigate

Now you know how to use section and page breaks in Microsoft Word to better organize your document. Section breaks also let you have more granular control over the formatting of specific parts of your document. These make your document look better as well as easier to read and navigate through.

How To Insert Or Remove A Page Break In Microsoft Word 2024 ⋆ Kyocera Intelligence

Page breaks are incredibly useful when it comes to formatting your Microsoft Word documents so that they look exactly the way you want them to. The page breaks tool allows you to determine where a page begins and ends. Here is some information about how to insert and remove page breaks in Microsoft Word 2024 as well as the types of page breaks that exist.

How to Add a Page Break

When a page can no longer fit additional content, Word automatically adds a page break. However, in some cases, you may want to add page breaks elsewhere. For example, if you’re working on a lengthy document, you may want to create to add a page break to create a new section. Page breaks are also useful when it comes to adding space around images and other graphics.

Fortunately, the process of creating a page break is incredibly simple.

1. Move your cursor where you want to begin a new page. For example, if you want to add a page break between two paragraphs, you should place the cursor before the first character of the second paragraph.

You can also the keyboard shortcut CTRL + Enter to add a page break quickly.

Other Kinds of Page Breaks

In Microsoft Word, there are many different types of breaks that you can add.

Column Break: If you have multiple columns in your document, you can use a column break to start adding content to a new column. Using a column break is far better than simply pressing the Enter key to move to the next column. Even if you make changes to the text or change the font size, you won’t have to worry about formatting as long as you use a column break instead of pressing the Enter key.

Text Wrapping: Another type of page break is text wrapping. If you have an image or in your document, you can use a text wrapping break to ensure the rest of the content flows around the image and the caption.

Next Page: The Next Page feature works similarly to the Page Break feature. The main difference is that it creates a new section and gives you the option to use formatting that is different from the prior sections. For example, you can use the Next Page feature to rotate a section to portrait or landscape mode. You can also use different footers or headers or add columns to the next section without impacting the formatting of the rest of the document.

Continuous Break: The Continuous Break feature creates a new section but doesn’t have you begin on a new page.

Even and Odd Page Breaks: This feature allows you to add a section break. You will begin on the next odd or even page, depending on the type of break you pick. You can also format the even and odd pages of a document differently.

It is just as easy to remove page breaks from a document in Microsoft Word 2024.

Keep in mind that you can’t remove page breaks automatically added by Microsoft Word, However, you can change where these automatic page breaks land so that you can keep certain lines or paragraphs together.

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