Xu Hướng 11/2022 # How To Use Keywords In Your Cover Letters / 2023 # Top 14 View | Hoisinhvienqnam.edu.vn

Xu Hướng 11/2022 # How To Use Keywords In Your Cover Letters / 2023 # Top 14 View

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When you are writing a cover letter to accompany your resume as part of a job application, it’s important to make sure that every word counts. Your cover letter should enhance the employer’s view of your qualifications, so you can move from being an applicant to an interviewee.

Types of Keywords

Keywords are a vital element of a persuasive cover letter, as they’re capable of portraying a candidate as a highly qualified applicant for a job. These words fall into three general categories: skill words, results-oriented words, and words that show recognition for achievements.

This matching process is often performed by automated applicant tracking systems (ATSs), programmed to identify specific keywords and to rank all resumes accordingly before they even reach a hiring manager. If your cover letter and resume lack these keywords, they may be automatically cut from consideration at this stage of the evaluation.

Secondly, keywords that are incorporated into a cover letter will show the hiring manager how and why you are highly qualified for the job, allowing them to rank you among your competition and, ideally, to offer one of their interview slots to you.

Skill Keywords

Examples of skill keywords include: wrote, analyzed, quantified, planned, programmed, designed, created, built, taught, and trained.

For example, instead of saying “Quantitative stock analysis is an asset which I would bring to your firm,” you could say:

I utilized quantitative stock valuation techniques to create a portfolio for high net worth clients, which beat the market for three consecutive years.

The skills keywords included in your cover letters (and your resume) will help your application get selected by the software employers use to select candidates for further consideration. They will also show the hiring manager, at first glance, what skills you have that are related to the job for which he or she is hiring.

Results-Oriented Keywords

All employers are looking for employees who will add value and generate positive results for their organizations. That’s why it’s critical to integrate results-oriented language into your cover letters. Think about the bottom line for each job on your resume and how you might have made things better in your role.

Your cover letter should showcase your accomplishments, not just your skills or personal qualities. Providing these details will help to set your letter apart from those of other candidates who don’t highlight their professional achievements.

Examples of results-oriented keywords include: increased, reduced, redesigned, upgraded, initiated, implemented, reformulated, generated, and produced.

Results-oriented words are most effective when coupled with some numbers which quantify your impact, as in:

I reduced turnover among first-year hires by 20% by implementing a mentoring system.

By using these types of keywords, you are clearly showing what you accomplished in your previous roles.

Recognition Keywords

Hiring managers will be more likely to believe that you will be an outstanding performer if it is clear that previous employers have viewed you in this way. One way to do this is to incorporate language which demonstrates that employers have recognized your contributions.

Examples of recognition related keywords include: honored, awarded, promoted, selected, lauded for, received a bonus for, recognized, chosen, and credited.

Ideally, recognition phrases will include the type of individual who noted your achievement and the basis for your recognition. For example, you might say:

I was designated as the team leader for the budget reduction task force by my Division Vice President, based on my previous record of accruing cost savings.

Recognition keywords attest to how you have excelled in your previous jobs and how you have accomplished more than was required.

Take the Time to Make a Match

When you’re choosing keywords to include in your cover letter, an easy way to find the best words to use is to match your qualifications to those listed in the job listing. Highlight your strongest assets, so you can show the employer why you’re well-qualified for the job and deserving of an interview.

How To Write A Cover Letter: The Best Advice Ever / 2023

Ah, the dreaded cover letter. Every time you sit down to write one, you probably browse cover letter examples online, get overwhelmed, and think something to the effect of: Does anyone really read these? Wouldn’t it be so much easier if I could just let my resume speak for itself?

First off: Yes, we can assure you that cover letters do, in fact, get read. In fact, to some hiring managers, they’re the most important part of your job application. And yes, while it would be easier to let your resume speak for itself, if that was the case you’d completely miss the opportunity to tell prospective employers who you are, showcase why they should hire you, and stand out above all the other candidates.

Write a Fresh Cover Letter for Each Job

Yes, it’s way faster and easier to take the cover letter you wrote for your last application, change the name of the company, and send it off. But most employers want to see that you’re truly excited about the specific position and company-which means creating a custom letter for each position you apply for.

While it’s OK to recycle a few strong sentences and phrases from one cover letter to the next, don’t even think about sending out a 100% generic letter. “Dear Hiring Manager, I am excited to apply to the open position at your company” is an immediate signal to recruiters and hiring managers that you’re resume-bombing every job listing in town. Mistakes like this can get your application tossed straight in the trash.

But Go Ahead, Use a Template

That said, there’s nothing that says you can’t get a little help. Try our basic cover letter template, or one that focuses on your skills.

Include the Hiring Manager’s Name

The most traditional way to address a cover letter is to use the person’s first and last name, including “Mr.” or “Ms.” (for example, “Dear Ms. Jane Smith” or just “Dear Ms. Smith”). If you know for sure that the company or industry is more casual, you can drop the title and last name (“Dear Jane”). And if you’re not 100% positive whether to use “Mr.” or “Ms.” based on the name and some Googling, definitely skip the title.

Never use generic salutations like ” To Whom it May Concern ” or “Dear Sir or Madam”-they’re stiff, archaic, and did we mention that cover letters need to be customized? If you can’t figure out the specific hiring manager’s name, try addressing your cover letter to the head of the department for the role you’re applying for. Or if you honestly can’t find a single real person to address your letter to, aim for something that’s still somewhat specific, like “Systems Engineer Hiring Manager” or “Account Executive Search Committee.”

For more help, read these rules for addressing your cover letter, and a few tips for how to find the hiring manager.

Craft a Killer Opening Line

No need to lead with your name-the hiring manager can see it already on your resume. It’s good to mention the job you’re applying for (the hiring manager may be combing through candidates for half a dozen different jobs), and yes, you could go with something simple like, “I am excited to apply for [job] with [Company].” But consider introducing yourself with a snappy first sentence that highlights your excitement about the company you’re applying to, your passion for the work you do, or your past accomplishments.

Need inspiration? Check out these examples of how to start your cover letter in an engaging, attention-grabbing way, or these eight examples of awesome cover letters that actually worked.

Go Beyond Your Resume

A super common pitfall many job seekers fall into is to use their cover letter to regurgitate what’s on their resume. Don’t simply repeat yourself: “I was in charge of identifying and re-engaging former clients.” Instead, expand on those bullet points to paint a fuller picture of your experiences and accomplishments, and show off why you’d be perfect for the job and the company.

For example: “By analyzing past client surveys, NPS scores, and KPIs, as well as simply picking up the phone, I was able to bring both a data-driven approach and a human touch to the task of re-engaging former clients.”

Having trouble figuring out how to do this? Try asking yourself these questions:

What approach did you take to tackling one of the responsibilities you’ve mentioned on your resume?

What details would you include if you were telling someone a (very short!) story about how you accomplished that bullet point?

What about your personality, passion, or work ethic made you especially good at getting the job done?

Think Not What the Company Can Do for You

Another common cover letter mistake? Talking about how great the position would be for you and your resume. Frankly, hiring managers are aware of that-what they really want to know is what you’re going to bring to the position and company. Try to identify the company’s pain points -the problem or problems that they need the person they hire to solve. Then emphasize the skills and experience you have that make you the right person to solve them.

On that note…

Highlight the Right Experiences

Not sure what skills and experiences you should be featuring? Typically the most important requirements for the position will be listed first in the job description, or mentioned more than once. You’ll want to make sure you describe how you can deliver on those key priorities.

Another trick: Drop the text of the job description into a word cloud tool like WordClouds, and see what stands out. That’s what the hiring manager is looking for most.

Showcase Your Skills

When you know you have the potential to do the job-but your past experience doesn’t straightforwardly sell you as the perfect person for the position-try focusing on your skills instead. That skills-based template we mentioned before will help you do just that. (Psst: You can also take this approach with a skills-based resume.)

…Not Necessarily Your Education

Don’t Apologize for Your Missing Experience

When you don’t meet all of the job requirements, it’s tempting to use lines like, “Despite my limited experience as a manager…” or “While I may not have direct experience in marketing…” But why apologize? Instead of drawing attention to your weaknesses, emphasize the strengths and transferable skills you do have.

Here’s what that might look like: “I’m excited to translate my experience in [what you’ve done in the past] to a position that’s more [what you’re hoping to do next].”

Throw in a Few Numbers

Hiring managers love to see stats-they show you’ve had a measurable impact on an organization or company you’ve worked for. That doesn’t mean you have to have doubled revenue at your last job. Did you bring in more clients than any of your peers? Put together an impressive number of events? Made a process at work 30% more efficient? Those numbers speak volumes about what you could bring to your next position, and make your cover letter stand out.

You don’t even have to have worked with numbers at all! Check out a few more tips for adding stats to those resume bullets, even if your previous jobs involved dealing with people, not figures.

Consider Testimonials

Used sparingly, great feedback from former co-workers, managers, or clients can go a long way toward illustrating your passion or skills.

Be Open to Other Formats

If you’re applying to a more traditional company, then the tried-and-true three-to-five-paragraph format probably makes sense. However, if you’re gunning for a more creative or startup job-or need to explain to the hiring manager, say, how your career has taken you from teaching to business development-a different approach could be appropriate.

Here at The Muse, we’ve seen cover letters use bullet points, tell stories, or showcase videos to (successfully) get their point across. One woman wrote a cover letter from her dog’s perspective. This professional even turned hers into a BuzzFeed-style list!

Cut the Formality

We know, you’re trying to be professional. But being excessively formal can actually backfire on you, career expert Mark Slack points out: “It makes you seem insincere and even robotic, not anything like the friendly, approachable, and awesome-to-work-with person you are.”

Even when you’re applying for a very corporate role, there’s usually room to express yourself in a conversational, genuine way.

Write in the Company’s “Voice”

Cover letters are a great way to show that you understand the environment and culture of the company and industry. Spending some time reading over the company website or stalking their social media before you get started can be a great way to get in the right mindset-you’ll get a sense for the company’s tone, language, and culture, which are all things you’ll want to mirror as you’re writing.

Go Easy on the Enthusiasm

Don’t Let Your Fear of Bragging Get in the Way

If you tend to have a hard time writing about yourself, here’s a quick trick: What would your favorite boss, your best friend, or your mentor say about you? How would they sing your praises? Then write the letter from their point of view.

Keep it Short and Sweet

There are always exceptions to the rule, but in general, for resumes and cover letters alike, don’t go over a page. In one survey, more than two-thirds of employers said they preferred a cover letter that’s either just half a page (around 250 words) or ” the shorter the better.”

Having trouble getting rid of your carefully crafted sentences? Check out these tips for cutting down your cover letter to a page or less.

Finish Strong

It’s tempting to treat the final lines of your cover letter as a throwaway: “I look forward to hearing from you.” But your closing paragraph is your last chance to emphasize your enthusiasm for the company or how you’d be a great fit for the position.

For example, you could say: “I’m passionate about [Company]’s mission and would love to bring my [add your awesome skills here] to this position.” You can also use the end of your letter to add important details-like, say, the fact that you’re willing to relocate for the job. Check out more examples and a template here, and read about a few cover letter closing lines you definitely don’t want to use.

Edit

We shouldn’t have to tell you to run your cover letter through spell-check (you should!), but remember that having your computer scan for typos isn’t the same as editing. Set your letter aside for a day or even a few hours, and then read through it again with fresh eyes-you’ll probably notice some changes you want to make. You might even want to ask a friend or family member to give it a look.

If you need some extra help, you can check out how the wording sounds to others using Hemingway. Paste in your text, and the app will highlight sentences and sections that are too complex or wordy, use passive voice, or are overloaded with fancy vocabulary when simpler words will do. You don’t have to take all of its suggestions (maybe “facilitate” really is the best word choice there!), but it’s a handy way to check the readability of your letter.

Remember, one spelling or grammar mistake can be all it takes to turn off the hiring manager-especially if writing skills are an important part of the role you’re applying for.

Have Someone Gut Check It

Have a friend take a look at your cover letter, and ask him or her two questions: Does this sell me as the best person for the job? and Does it get you excited? If the answer to either is “no,” or even slight hesitation, go back for another pass.

Finally, read this if you’re looking to write a letter of intent instead of a cover letter-yes, there’s a difference.

Q&Amp;A: What’S The Ideal Cover Letter Length? / 2023

What is the ideal length of a cover letter? Too short and your cover letter will seem generic and lacking in effort, too long and you’ll come across as unfocused. Employers only spend a limited time reading your cover letter. You can make the most of that time by including compelling, brief descriptions of your experience and qualifications-all without repeating yourself.

How long should a cover letter be?

Cover letters should be between half a page to one full page in length. Limit your cover letter length to 4 paragraphs, opening each with a succinct topic sentence and closing with an attention-grabbing final thought.

Image description

Cover Letter Format

Date and contact information

Salutation or greeting

Opening paragraph

Middle paragraph(s)

Closing paragraph

Letter ending and signature

Below, we’ve included eight ways to reach the correct length for your cover letter, and impress the hiring manager along the way.

Related: How to Write a Cover Letter

1. Check length requirements

Sometimes employers may include specific directions for your cover letter in the job posting. They might give you a cover letter word limit or provide a writing prompt or questions for you to answer. Make a good first impression by following any instructions they give you, including word count or cover letter length directions.

2. Don’t focus on hitting a specific word count

How many words should a cover letter be? Unless the employer has specified otherwise, 250 to 400 words is the right amount. This length will fill half a page or one full page using 12 point font, while still leaving room for the correct spacing and margins.

The important thing, however, is to focus on the content of your cover letter and use word count as a general guideline to keep you on the right track.

Related: 7 Key Elements of a Successful Cover Letter

3. Embrace white space

White space makes your cover letter more enjoyable for the hiring manager to read. Break up your text by adding a blank line between paragraphs, setting 1-inch margins on each side. With lots of white space, your cover letter will look like an enjoyable read rather than a wall of text.

4. Limit your cover letter to four paragraphs

Generally, your cover letter should be between half a page and one full page in length. Divide your cover letter into three or four short paragraphs that can be read in around 10 seconds or less. In these paragraphs, include a strong topic sentence and write just enough to prove that you’re interested in the job and company, as well as highlight the skills you can bring to the new role.

Read more: How to Format a Cover Letter (With Example)

5. Keep paragraphs focused and sentences short

For maximum impact, focus each of your paragraphs around one central idea. Lead with a strong topic sentence. This sentence will tell the reader what your paragraph is about. Next, add several short, descriptive sentences that support this main idea. Finally, wrap up each paragraph with an attention-grabbing final thought or a brief conclusion sentence that recaps your main idea.

Here’s an example of how to structure your cover letter paragraphs:

Topic sentence

One of the factors that really attracted me to this role is that [Company Name] values giving back to the community.

Descriptive sentences

In my spare time, I run free web development workshops for at-risk youths. In these workshops, I serve as a mentor and teach the basics of HTML/CSS and JavaScript.

Conclusion

As I grow in my career, applying my skills to help others and make an impact on the world becomes more important-I believe this role would give me that opportunity.

Related: 7 Powerful Ways to Start a Cover Letter

6. Include impactful and relevant stories

Your cover letter should briefly explain why you’re qualified for the role using highly relevant examples from your work history. If you’re not sure about which qualifications or experiences to include, look back at the job description for clues. Match your skills to the requirements the employer is asking for. Expand upon those qualifications in your letter by citing recent accomplishments.

You can make your stories impactful by using the STAR method. STAR stands for Situation (the context of your story), Task (your role in this situation), Action (what you did in this situation), and Result (the outcome you achieved). This format makes it clear what happened and what you contributed.

Here’s an example of how to use the STAR method in a cover letter:

Recently, my current employer launched a new service to meet a specific need for small businesses.

My role was to draft the press release and engage local media to create interest in the launch.

I took the press release through several rounds of review with the company’s senior leadership and incorporated their feedback. I was able to secure media coverage in our city’s leading publications as well as with the Chamber of Commerce.

On the day we launched the service, the new service was covered on the front page of the business section of the leading local paper-both print and online. We saw our site’s traffic increase 5X the daily average and received unprecedented inbound interest from new and existing small business clients. It was one of the most successful launches in the history of the company.

Related: How to Write Strong Bullet Points for Your Resume

7. Don’t give everything away

The purpose of your cover letter is to generate curiosity and land an interview. For this reason, avoid explaining every single quality you will bring to this new role. Instead, focus on your proudest accomplishments and reveal just enough about yourself to catch the hiring manager’s interest and encourage them to invite you for an interview. Slightly less than one page is a great cover letter length for achieving this.

8. Trim it down

What if you can’t fit everything you want to include on one page? Consider having your friends and family read through your cover letter to edit out unnecessary details and wordy language. Leave in your most impressive achievements, but cut out any mention of day-to-day job duties. Remember, cover letters should never extend beyond one page-even for the most experienced candidates.

Related: 6 Universal Rules for Resume Writing

How To Take Your Resume To The Next Level Using Powerful Words / 2023

It is not so easy to write a resume that will grab recruiter’s attention on the spot and will impress them enough to invite you for interviews. Therefore, while applying for jobs, you should think of diverse strategies and powerful resume words are among the best ones. Your well-written and well-organized resume can help showcase your core strengths and career skills and convince recruiters that you are the best professional fit for the position. Keep reading, if you want to know why strong resume words are important for creating a unique resume or cover letter, which types exist and how to properly use them in your resume or cover letter and become a dream candidate.

The importance of power words for resume

Types of powerful action words

· Action verbs

Strong, compelling action verbs are the first type. This kind of strong verbs demonstrates your capability to succeed in a position. Descriptive verbs can show your skills that you have implemented during your previous experience and that led you to achieve success.

For example, these strong verbs are: accomplished, managed, initiated, launched, supervised, designed, implemented.

· Company values

· Common skill words

You should include some specific skills, personal traits, and qualities that hiring managers and employers are willing to see in a perfect candidate’s resume. For example, recruiters are seeking a responsible person with leadership skills. Try to demonstrate all your main skills but don’t use cheesy language. You will definitely find a synonym for team player. There are a few synonyms for hard worker (variants such as “achiever”, “laborious” or “industrious” will be suitable).

· Keywords

Include keywords from job description in your resume and cover letter. It is necessary to demonstrate recruiter that you meet all the requirements and will be a suitable fit for a position. But try not to exaggerate your abilities and skills. Include only those that you can prove with some concrete examples from your professional life.

· Industry jargon

There is certain vocabulary inherent for a specific field. Industry jargon is very important, so it’s imperative to include some. However, you should know how to use these words appropriately and accurately in order to showcase your competency. It will also demonstrate that you understand this professional domain and you are a part of it. So, don’t use words, if you don’t know their exact meaning. Otherwise, recruiters will never consider your candidacy because misusing industry jargon is a sign that you are not qualified enough for a job.

How to use power words

Use these diverse power words throughout your resume. They will be appropriate in your professional summary as well as in job descriptions. In order to make your application stronger, include action words in cover letter while describing your skills and achievements. Try not to repeat words. There are so many synonyms so try to impress recruiters with diversity.

List of top used powerful resume words

Each candidate has to remember that hiring managers spend only 6 seconds to skim applicant’s resume. They simply don’t have time to read all the CVs they receive. Therefore, it is extremely important to use these action-packed words to write a compelling resume or cover letter that will help you in getting hired. Here is the list that can help you. Choose some of these words:

Absorb, Accelerate, Access, Accomplish, Accrue, Acquire, Achieve, Act, Activate, Adapt, Address, Adjust, Administer, Advertise, Advise, Advocate, Affirm, Aid, Alert, Align, Allocate, Analyze, Apply, Appraise, Approve, Arbitrate, Arranged, Assemble, Assess, Assign, Assist, Attain, Authorize, Award

A

Begin, Brief, Bring, Broadcast, Budget, Build, Business

B

Calculate, Campaign, Certify, Chaired, Change, Chart, Check, Choose, Clarify, Classify, Coach, Collaborate, Collate, Collect, Combine, Communicate, Compare, Compile, Complete, Comply, Compose, Compute, Conceptualize, Conclude, Condense, Conduct, Confer, Configure, Connect, Conserve, Consolidate, Construct, Consult, Contact, Continue, Contribute, Control, Convert, Convey, Convince, Coordinate, Correspond, Counsel, Critique, Cultivate, Customize

C

Decide, Declare, Decline, Decorate, Dedicate, Define, Delegate, Deliver, Demonstrate, Depreciate, Describe, Design, Detail Oriented, Determine, Develop, Development, Devise, Diagnose, Direct, Dispatch, Dispense, Distribute, Document, Draft

D

Edit, Educate, Effective, Efficient, Emphasize, Encourage, Energized, Enforce, Engineer, Enhance, Ensure, Enthusiastic, Establish, Estimate, Evaluate, Examine, Execute, Expand, Expedite, Experience, Explain

E

Fabricate, Facilitate, Finance, Focus, Forecast, Formulate, Foster, Fund, Furnish

F

Gain, Generate, Graduate, Greet, Guide

G H

Identify, Illustrate, Implement, Improve, Improvise, Increase, Index, Influence, Inform, Initiate, Initiative, Innovate, Inspire, Install, Institute, Integrate, Interact, Interested, Interview, Introduce, Investigate, Itemize

I J K

Launch, Leadership, Learn, Lecture, Lessen, Lift, Link, Listen

L

Maintain, Manage, Management, Manipulate, Map, Market, Measure, Mediate, Merge, Mobilize, Modify, Monitor, Motivate

M N

Observe, Obtain, Open, Operate, Order, Organize, Originate, Outpace, Outperform

O

Participate, Passion, Perform, Persuade, Plan, Practical, Prepare, Present, Prevent, Printed, Prioritize, Priority, Process, Produce, Professional, Program, Project, Promote, Propose, Prospect, Prove, Provide, Publicize, Purchase, Pursue

P Q

Run, Rate, Reach, Receive, Recommend, Reconcile, Record, Recruit, Reduce, Refer, Refocus, Regulate, Reorganize, Repair, Replace, Report, Represent, Research, Reserve, Resolve, Respond, Responsibility, Restore, Restructure, Results, Results-Oriented, Retrieve, Review, Revise, Revitalize

R

Schedule, Screen, Search, Secure, Seize, Select, Send, Serve, Share, Showcase, Simplify, Skill, Solution, Solve, Sort, Specialize, Specify, Sponsor, Staff, Standardize, Start, Succeed, Suggest, Summarize, Supervise, Supply, Support, Surpass, Survey, Sustain

S

Target, Teach, Team, Team Player, Test, Timely, Track, Trade, Train, Transact, Transcribe, Transform, Translate, Transmit, Transport, Tutor

T

Unite, Update, Upgrade, Use, Utilize

U

Validate, Value, Verify, View, Volunteer

V

Watch, Weigh, Witness, Win, Write

W Y

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