Xu Hướng 11/2022 # How To Format Microsoft Word Tables Using Table Styles / 2023 # Top 17 View | Hoisinhvienqnam.edu.vn

Xu Hướng 11/2022 # How To Format Microsoft Word Tables Using Table Styles / 2023 # Top 17 View

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Apply and Modify Table Styles in Word Documents

Applies to: Microsoft ® Word ® 2013, 2016, 2019 or 365 (Windows)

You can apply table styles to your Word tables to format them quickly and consistently. Word is shipped with several built-in table styles or you can create your own. You can edit table styles by modifying borders, shading, character formatting, paragraph formatting and table properties. If your document includes multiple tables, table styles can save a lot of time.

Note: Buttons and Ribbon tabs may display in a different way (with or without text) depending on your version of Word, the size of your screen and your Control Panel settings. For Word 365 users, Ribbon tabs may appear with different names. For example, the Table Tools Design tab may appear as Table Design.

Recommended article: How to Keep a Microsoft Word Table Together on One Page

Table styles and themes

Every Word document uses a document theme which includes a font theme and color theme. The colors used in table styles are based on the color theme.

You can select document themes, color themes and font themes using the Themes, Colors or Fonts drop-down menus on the Design tab in the Ribbon:

Turning gridlines on

When you are working with tables, it’s a good idea to turn gridlines on. Borders, which are a format, will print. Gridlines do not print.

To turn on gridlines:

If your Word document contains multiple tables that you want to format in a consistent way, it’s best to use table styles rather than applying manual or direct formatting to each table.

To apply a table style to a table:

Hover over the various table styles. The table formatting will change as you move over different table styles in the gallery.

Below is the Table Styles gallery (the current theme is the Office theme):

Selecting Table Style Options

Once you have selected a table style, you can select different Table Style Options (which are affected by the formats in the table style).

To select Table Style Options:

In Table Style Options, check or uncheck Header Row. If this option is checked, the header row will be formatted differently from the body rows.

In Table Style Options, check or uncheck Total Row. If this option is checked, the last row will be formatted differently from the body rows.

In Table Style Options, check or uncheck Banded Rows or Banded Columns for alternate row or column shading.

In Table Style Options, check First Column or Last Column if you want the first or last column formatted differently from the other columns.

You can modify a table style in a Word document and all tables using that table style will change.

To modify a table style:

From the Apply Formatting to drop-down menu, select the element that you want to modify (such as Header row).

Select the desired formatting such as font, font size, font color, fill and border.

From the Apply Formatting to drop-down menu, select the next element that you want to modify.

Select the desired formatting such as font, font size, font color, fill and border.

Repeat for other elements.

Select Only in this document or New documents based on this template. If you select Only in this document, the modified style will only be available for the current document. If you select New documents based on this template, then the table style will be modified for future documents based on the current template (usually the Normal template).

Below is the Modify Style dialog box:

You can also modify Table Properties in a table style. Table properties include table alignment, row settings and cell margins.

To modify Table Properties in a table style:

Select any other formatting options you want to apply to the entire table.

Select Only in this document or New documents based on this template.

Below is the Table Properties dialog box with the Table tab selected:

You can also create a new or custom table style.

To create a custom table style:

Enter a name for the new table in the Name box.

Select the desired formatting.

Select Only in this document or New documents based on this template.

New Table Style appears at the bottom of the Table Styles gallery:

Clearing a table style

To clear a table style and remove formatting:

Clear appears at the bottom of the Table Styles gallery:

You can also set a default table style for new tables in the current document or all new documents.

To set a default table style:

Select This document only or All documents based on the chúng tôi template (the default template in Word is the Normal template).

If you are working with documents with multiple tables, formatting with table styles can ensure that your tables are formatted consistently and save a lot of time.

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More resources

10 Microsoft Word Tips, Tricks and Shortcuts for Selecting in Tables Microsoft Word Tricks to Keep Text Together (Words, Lines or Paragraphs) 14 Shortcuts to Quickly Select Text in Microsoft Word

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Using Tables In Microsoft Word 2010 / 2023

Inserting Tables

Before we identify the different parts of a table, let’s go ahead and insert one into our document. To do this, position the cursor at the point in the document where you want to put the table. Don’t worry if it’s not exactly right-you can always move or manipulate it later.

The tool you’re going to use to insert a table is almost directly under the Insert tab. It looks like this:

Here’s an example of a 3 X 3 table using Insert Table:

We know that, without having to count each box, because Word tells us with the text right above the boxes. See where it says “3×3 Table”? Cool, huh? And convenient.

We now have a basic table. So let’s identify the parts.

Each box is called a “Cell.” There are 9 cells in the example above.

The “Rows” go from top to bottom. In the example below, the rows are numbered from one to three and the 1 st row is highlighted.

Columns go from left to right. In this example, the columns are numbered and the middle column (2.) is highlighted. In a program such as Excel, the rows are usually expressed in numbers while the columns are expressed in letters. For instance, in our example Row 1, Column 2 might be expressed as 1b.

So now that we’ve identified the parts of a table, let’s take a look at the other ways in which we can add them.

Using the Insert Table Dialogue

A dialogue launches in the center of your screen. It looks like this.

By default, the column width will adjust automatically to fit the text and objects you insert into a cell. If you don’t want this to happen, you can select “Fixed column width” and set a fixed value.

Drawing a Table

If you know your table is not going to be uniform (regularly sized columns and rows), you can “draw” a table. This is particularly helpful when using tables to create complex page layouts.

Selecting parts of tables

You can select and change the attributes of any row, column, or individual cell.

You can select an entire table using either of those methods.

Adding Text to a Table

Converting Text into a Table

You can convert text into a table. This is especially handy if you’ve already written information that you think would be more effectively conveyed in a table.

To do this, you’ll have to carve up the text into columns and rows using commas and new paragraphs. That’s how you tell Word to separate the text into individual cells. Simply place a comma between the text you want to put into a column and place a paragraph where you want to begin a new row. An example of the text might look like this:

Look at the example below to see the final result.

Quick Tables

Formatting Tables with the Table Tools

Whenever you create or select a table, the Table Tools will open automatically over the Design and Layout tabs in the tool bar. It allows you to easily apply table styles, borders, and shading attributes and more. Below is an example of the Design layout tools available for tables.

A zoom of the Design layout tools for tables, left and right is below:

The Layout tab, when associated with the Table Tools, allows you to easily insert rows and columns, and format text and objects within cells. The Table Tools ribbon is below and the zoom of their left and right sections is below it.

Adjusting the Width of Individual Columns

There are several ways to adjust the width of individual columns:

o Select the column, then go to the Table Tool/Layout tab and type a figure into the Width box as in the following example.

Adjusting Width of All Columns

To fix the width of all of the columns at once, select the entire table and use the Width box in the Table Tool/Layout tab to adjust the columns to the desired size.

You can also use the Distribute Columns button to make all of the columns the same size.

Adjust rows in the same way, except use the Height field.

Adding Rows and Columns

There are two ways to add a new row or column to a table.

o Insert Columns to the Left

o Insert Columns to the Right

o Choose an option from the Rows & Columns section of the ribbon.

Deleting Cells, Rows or Columns

You will then have the option of deleting a cell, a row, a column, or the entire table.

Merging Cells and Splitting Cells

Borders and Shading

The way information in a table is presented determines how easily it can be understood. Use the borders and shading features to control the look of a table.

The borders and shading tools can be found in the Table Styles group on the Design tab under Table Tools.

Microsoft Word 2010 provides some customizable templates. Roll your mouse over one of them, and you will see a preview in your selected table.

Use the Borders button to add or remove borders or adjust the stroke width. Use the Shading feature to control the color of a cell, row or column.

A drop cap is a simple embellishment that, if used correctly, can make your documents look more interesting and professional. Basically, it’s a letter at the beginning of a section or paragraph that is larger than the text that follows it, but instead of extending upward (which is what it would do if you just tried to increase the font size for a single letter) it drops a few lines down:

You can have the letter drop as many lines as you’d like, and even choose how much space to put between it and the text that follows.

Watermarks

You’re probably familiar with watermarks. They can sometimes be seen stamped into expensive bond paper, and they are visible when you hold twenty-dollar-bills up to the light. You’re probably thinking, though, “Cool, Word 2010 can do that?” The answer is, “Sort of.”

A real watermark is stamped into a page with expensive equipment. All Word 2010 does, really, is allows you to place a light, printable image behind all the text and objects in a document. You can use it to add an effect to the document, mark it as a sample or draft, or even authenticate it.

Unlike most objects that can be inserted into a document, the watermark button isn’t located on the Insert tab. Instead, to place one in your document, go to the Page Layout tab and look at the Page Background section of the ribbon. It is placed here because really, that’s what a watermark is-a background. It cannot be manipulated or moved around like other objects.

Borders and Shading

Borders can be applied to an entire page, an entire document, or just certain sections of the document. They can also be applied to paragraphs.

Change Table Style In Word / 2023

By default, a table is created with the Table Grid style, which includes a basic black border around each cell in the table. Word includes many built-in styles that provide more visual appeal.

The Table Styles group will show a few table styles, but to see the rest, you’ll need to expand the gallery.

Select a style.

The style is applied to the table, changing the borders, shading, and colors.

You could create a new style by selecting New Table Style or modify an existing one by selecting Modify Table Style and choosing which formatting you’d like.

To remove a Table Style, select Clear from the More Table Styles menu.

You can further customize a table style by changing the table style options.

Use the check boxes in the Table Style Options group to toggle the following settings:

Header Row will apply special formatting to the first row of the table. This special formatting can include font effects, or font, background, and border color.

First Column will apply special formatting to the first column.

Total Row will add special formatting to the final row of a table, designed to summarize the rows above it.

Last Column will apply special formatting to the last column to summarize the earlier columns.

Banded Rows will alternate the background color of rows.

Banded Columns will alternate the background color of columns.

You can control how text is aligned within a table cell, just like you’d align text on the page.

Select the cell or cells you want to align.

You could also select the entire table if you want to align all the text together.

Expand the Alignment group, if necessary.

There are nine alignment options, letting you align the content to either side of a cell, any corner, or center it in the middle of the cell.

Select an alignment option.

The text in the selected cell realigns to the selected side or corner.

You can also select Text Direction to change the text from left-to-right to top-to-bottom or bottom-to-top.

You can also adjust the margins between cell borders and the text within those cells.

Select cell or cells you want to adjust.

You can select the entire table to adjust all the margins at once.

From the Layout tab, expand the Alignment group, if necessary.

In the Table Options dialog box, we can adjust the margins for the selected cell or cells. The margin affects how much space there is between the edge of the cell and the contents of that cell.

Adjust the margins.

You can adjust the margin on each side of the cell independently.

The cell margins are changed.

How Do I… Create And Format Tables In Word 2003? / 2023

This article was originally published on January 1, 2006.

If you’re a regular reader on TechRepublic, you may have seen my series covering various features in Microsoft Excel. While I am finished with that particular series (unless you send ideas for things you’d like to see, of course!), I will be tying this new series -all about Word-in with Excel fairly tightly.

That said, I won’t be doing much integrating with Excel in this particular article, which focuses on tables in Microsoft Word.

A little about this series

I mentioned above that tables are useful for a number of purposes. To that end, I will focus on two common uses of tables after providing an introduction:

How tables work

Using tables to create professional-looking forms

A lot about tables

The tables feature is so useful and popular in Word that Microsoft has devoted an entire menu ( Figure A) to this feature.

Over the course of this three-article series, we’ll cover every option on this menu.

Into this grid, you can put anything you like: text, numbers, pictures — whatever goes into Word will go into a table, too.

Creating a table

When you use the Insert Table button, you get a miniature grid. Using this grid, you tell Word how large you would like your table. In Figure C, a table that is three columns wide and two rows deep would be created. If you make a mistake with the number of rows and columns, don’t worry too much about it. You can always change it later.

In Figure D, notice that the dialog box tells you exactly how many rows and columns will be created for your new table — in this case, five columns and two rows. If you go this route, again, don’t worry if you make a mistake.

For example, rather than the usual row and column format, you could create a table that looks something like the one shown in Figure E.

Navigating your table

Adding and deleting rows and columns

It’s easy to add rows to the end of your table, but what if you need to sneak something in between two rows you already have, or you need to add a column? What about deleting a row or column? No problem.

Shortcuts for adding and deleting rows and columns

Formatting your table

Just like everything else in Word, your table can be formatted with different fonts, colors, line styles, and more. And even after your table is initially created, you can add and remove borders to create a custom table like the one you saw in Figure E.

Changing the line weight, color, and style

Most tables have some kind of grid. But in Word, you can keep the table and remove the grid, change the grid line style to some other type, and change the color of the lines altogether.

On the toolbar ( Figure I), the four options to the right of the Eraser button handle the line styles in your table.

Figure K below shows you an example of what different borders might look like in your table.

Changing the alignment in each cell

You can also change the position of the text in each individual cell in your table. In some cells, you might want the text centered both horizontally and vertically, while in another cell, you might want the text aligned at the bottom-right corner. This is where the cell alignment options come in ( Figure L).

Using this drop-down list, you can quickly change the position of text in your table. Take a look at Figure M to see an example of what you can do. Figure M shows you all of the available alignment options.

Distribute rows and columns

Are you a neat freak? Or do you just want to make sure that your table looks professional? One way you can do that is to make sure your rows and columns are sized appropriately. For example, if you’re showing monthly budget information, your column widths for each month should look the same rather than being all different sizes. Take a look at Figure N to see what I mean.

It’s actually easy to make your table look neat: Use the Distribute Rows Evenly and Distribute Columns Evenly buttons on the toolbar ( Figure O).

You can also manually change the width of a column or the height of a row ( Figure P). When you’re in your table, take a look at both your horizontal and your vertical ruler bars. Each one is broken up with a control that just happens to be at the break point for each row and column.

AutoFormat

From this window, you can peruse the multitude of styles provided by Word, make a modification to one of the templates, or even create your own style. The AutoFormat option allows you to specify which areas you will apply to your table. For example, if you don’t have a header row on your table, you might now want to have the special boldfaced heading text, so you can deselect the Heading Rows option. Figure R shows you the results of using AutoFormat on the mini-budget table. Note that every other line is shaded in this example. Doing that manually on a large table could take quite some time.

Formatting options

Creating, customizing, and formatting tables in Word is largely a function of the specialized Tables And Borders toolbar. With Word, you can create tables of practically any size and shape.

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