Xu Hướng 2/2023 # (Archives) Microsoft Word 2007: Outlining: Bullet And Numbering Options # Top 7 View | Hoisinhvienqnam.edu.vn

Xu Hướng 2/2023 # (Archives) Microsoft Word 2007: Outlining: Bullet And Numbering Options # Top 7 View

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Last updated Monday, Aug. 31, 2020, at 10:36 a.m.

This article is based on legacy software.

An outline’s hierarchy is separated by levels. You can customize these levels by adding bullets or numbers. Bullets and numbers are useful because they help a user locate headings and levels with relative ease.

Customizing the Settings and Levels

Word provides various default outline settings. If you do not want to use these settings, you can create your own. You can customize the levels of both bulleted and numbered outline lists by using the Ribbon. Among the features you can customize are: the font of your bullets or numbers, their positions, and their numbering styles.

Customizing Outline Numbered Lists

Place the insertion point within the desired list

The Multilevel List pane appears.

Select an outline option

To customize your list, use one or more of the following options :

To customize style, from the Home command tab, in the Styles group, select the desired style

To customize font style, from the Home command tab, in the Font group, select the desired style

  • Repeat steps 1-4 for each outline level

    Applying Outline Numbering to Existing Text

    Bulleted or numbered lists can be applied to selected text at any time. To learn the basics of using bulleted or numbered lists, refer to Using Bulleted Lists or Using Numbered Lists.

    Select the text you want to apply outline numbering to

    The Multilevel List pane appears.

    Select the desired outline option The bullets or numbers are applied to your selected text. (Optional) To customize the outline option you just selected, refer to Customizing Outline Numbered Lists above

    Applying Outline Numbering as You Type

    You can select and customize your outline list prior to typing any list items. For instructions on the basics of using bulleted or numbered lists, refer to Using Bulleted Lists or Using Numbered Lists.

    Place the insertion point where list is to begin

    The Multilevel List pane appears.

    Select the desired list option

    (Optional) To customize the outline option you just selected, refer to Customizing Outline Numbered Lists above

    Type the text for the first list item NOTE: Word will automatically number or bullet your headings accordingly.

    Adding or Deleting Levels

    After you have customized your outline, you may need to add or delete levels. If you have a customized outline, added levels will automatically follow the customized format. Your customized outline will automatically adjust to deleted levels as well.

    Adding a Level

    Place the insertion point above the location where you want to insert a new level

    Press [Enter] The new level appears with the appropriate outline symbol to the left.

    Deleting a Level

    Select the level you want to delete

    Press [Delete]

    Helpful Keyboard Shortcuts

    Here are some helpful keyboard shortcuts to use when promoting/demoting the different levels and paragraphs of your outline.

    Action Key Combination Advance to next list item [Enter] Promote a list item [Shift] + [Tab] OR [Alt] + [Shift] + [Left Arrow] Demote a list item [Tab] OR [Alt] + [Shift] + [Right Arrow] Demote to body text [Ctrl] + [Shift] + [N] Select list item above [Alt] + [Shift] + [Up Arrow] Select list item below [Alt] + [Shift] + [Down Arrow]

    (Archives) Microsoft Word 2003: Paragraph Formatting Options

    Last updated

    This article is based on legacy software.

    This document will help you to use paragraph formatting options to achieve the desired look for your document.

    Changing Paragraph Alignment

    Text alignment, margins, and line spacing will affect the entire paragraph even if you have only a single word selected or the insertion point placed in the paragraph. To format multiple paragraphs, you need to select at least one character from each paragraph. You can align text with the right or left margins, center the text, or align the text with both margins.

    Changing Text Alignment: Toolbar Option

    Select the text to be formatted

    Changing Text Alignment: Menu Option

    Select the text to be formatted

    From the Format menu, select Paragraph… The Paragraph dialog box appears.

    Select the Indents and Spacing tab

    From the Alignment pull-down list, select Left, Centered, Right, or Justified

    Changing Text Alignment: Keyboard Option

    Select the text to be formatted

    Press the appropriate keyboard key:

    Alignment Option Keystroke

    Adjusting Line Spacing

    You can add space between lines within a paragraph by adjusting the line spacing. For example, you may want your text double-spaced. This is an efficient way of adding white space.

    Place the insertion point in the desired paragraph

    From the Format menu, select Paragraph… The Paragraph dialog box appears.

    Select the Indents and Spacing tab

    In the Spacing section, from the Line spacing pull-down list, select the desired spacing option Options include Single, 1.5 lines, Double, At least, Exactly, and Multiple.NOTE: The At least, Exactly, and Multiple options require that you enter the amount of space between lines in the At text box.

    Adjusting Paragraph Spacing

    Instead of putting extra returns at the end of paragraphs, add additional space before and after paragraphs by adjusting the paragraph spacing. This can be especially useful when you want the blank line to be a different height from the text.

    Place the insertion point in the desired paragraph

    From the Format menu, select Paragraph… The Paragraph dialog box appears.

    Select the Indents and Spacing tab

    In the Spacing section, in the Before text box, type the amount of space (in points) to appear before the paragraph

    In the After text box, type the amount of space (in points) to appear after the paragraph

    Working with Indents

    Rather than tabbing in the first line or every line of a paragraph, you can create an indent, which is the amount of space between the text and the page margin. You can adjust the indent for an individual paragraph, the indent for a group of paragraphs, or the margins for the entire document. If you are setting margins for the entire document, refer to Adjusting Document Margins.

    Word offers three types of indents: normal indents, first line indents, and hanging indents. A normal indent inserts a specified amount of space between the page margin and all the lines in a paragraph. A first line indent inserts space between the first line and the page margin so it looks like you used a tab. A hanging indent uses a normal indent for the first line and then moves subsequent lines farther to the right.

    Paragraph indents can be set using the Paragraph dialog box or the Ruler.

    Working with Indents: Dialog Box Option

    Place the insertion point in the desired paragraph HINT: If you are adjusting more than one paragraph, select all desired paragraphs.

    From the Format menu, select Paragraph… The Paragraph dialog box appears.

    Select the Indents and Spacing tab

    In the Indentation section, in the Left and Right text boxes, type the desired amount of indenting (in inches)

    To select a different indent for the first line, from the Special pull-down list, select First line or Hanging

    If you selected a first line or hanging indent, in the By text box, type the desired amount of indenting (in inches)

    Working with Indents: Ruler Option

    Instead of using the Paragraph dialog box, you can make indent adjustments using the Ruler. Shown here is a graphic of the Ruler.

    Type of Indent Appearance of Ruler Appearance of Text Normal Indent

    A Normal Indent looks like this

    Hanging Indent

    A Hanging Indent looks like this

    First Line Indent

    A First Line Indent looks like this

    To set the indent:

    Place the insertion point in the desired paragraph HINT: If you are adjusting more than one paragraph, select all desired paragraphs.

    How To Create Numbered Headings Or Outline Numbering In Word 2007 And Word 2010

    How you set up numbered headings depends on what version of Word you have. This page is about setting up numbered headings in Word 2007 and Word 2010. If you have Word 2003 or an earlier version, see How to create numbered headings or outline numbering in Word 2003 and earlier versions.

    Numbering run amok

    Word’s paragraph numbering sometimes goes haywire. Just when you think you’ve got it organized, the numbering starts doing silly things. If Word’s paragraph numbering were a group of orchestral musicians, it might look like this:

    Musicians run amok

    What’s needed?

    What’s needed is someone to get those mad horn players organized and co-ordinated [Lene Fredborg 12-Sep-2017: linked picture of orchestra removed – picture doesn’t exist anymore]. We don’t need another player: we clearly have enough of those! What we need is a co-ordinator.

    In an orchestra, the conductor co-ordinates. For Word’s numbering, the mechanism we use to organize and co-ordinate paragraph numbering is a List Style. The List Style co-ordinates. It doesn’t do the actual work of formatting text. We leave that to paragraph styles.

    So, we need:

    a List Style as the co-ordinating mechanism for the numbering, and

    a paragraph style for each heading level (Word allows, actually requires, 9 levels).

    Understanding List Styles

    A List Style has 9 levels. Each level can be linked to a paragraph style. And, each level stores information about how to number text to which that linked paragraph style has been applied.

    A List Style actually does two things.

    A List Style creates a set or group of styles. Word comes with built-in paragraph styles named Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3. But there is no connection between them. They just happen to share similar names. A List Style ‘groups’ those paragraph styles into some order. Only the List Style knows that Heading 1 is followed by Heading 2 and that it is followed by Heading 3. There are 9 levels in any List Style.

    A List Style stores the information about how to number each level. That includes the format of the number ( “1” or “a” or “i”), whether the number is preceded by text (eg “Chapter 1” or “Part A”), whether the number includes previous levels’ numbers (eg paragraph 1.4.3), and the indents (the distance from margin to number and from number to text).

    Set up your Heading paragraph styles

    There are good reasons for using the built-in Heading styles.

    Before you begin the numbering, make sure your Heading styles are set up appropriately.

    Modify the Heading 1 style so that it is based on “No style”. Modify Heading 2 so it’s based on Heading 1. Modify Heading 3 based on Heading 2. And so on. Not everyone does this, but I find it useful because of the way the formatting of Word’s styles cascade.

    Now, modify the Paragraph settings of every Heading style so that the Left Indent is 0, and the Special indent is set to (none). Do this even if you want your headings to be indented from the left margin, and even if you want a hanging indent. Why? Because for outline-numbered styles, we will set the paragraph indent and the hanging indents (if any) when we set up the numbering.

    Create a list style

    Figure 1: Choose the Multilevel list menu

    From the menu, choose Define New List Style (Figure 2).

    Figure 2: On the Multilevel list menu, choose the Define New List Style option.

    In the Define New List Style dialog (Figure 3), do (only) two things:

    Give your list style a name. Hint: Give it aplural name. That makes it clear that this is a list style that’s controlling more than one paragraph style. And, give it a name directly related to the paragraph styles you’re going to use. We’re going to use paragraph styles Heading 1, Heading 2, Heading 3 etc. So I suggest that you name the list style as Headings.

    We’re now in the Modify Multilevel List dialog box (Figure 5). The list style is the co-ordinating mechanism for the whole “set” of paragraph styles we’ll use. So we set up all levels of numbering in this one dialog box.

    To set up the numbering:

    Attach the Heading paragraph styles to the 9 levels in the list style. To do that:

    Now we tell Word about the numbering itself for Level 1

    Delete anything in the ‘Enter formatting for number” box.

    If you want the numbering to start with some text (eg to number a paragraph as “Chapter 1” or “Section 1”) then enter the text including any space in the ‘Enter formatting for number’ box. Leave the insertion point after your text.

    From the Number style for this level list, choose the kind of numbering you want.

    Set up numbering for levels 2 to 9.

    Delete anything in the ‘Enter formatting for number” box.

    If you want to include a previous level’s numbering, then use the ‘Include level number from’ box. If you want punctuation after each level, add it into the ‘Enter formatting for number’ box as you go.

    For example, for Level 2, I might want the numbering to be “1.1”. That is, I want the Level 1 number and the Level 2 number. So, from the ‘Include level number from’ box, I choose ‘Level 1’. Then I type a full stop (full point, period, whatever). Then I choose from the ‘Number style for this level’ box.

    You have to do each previous level separately. By the time you come to do Level 9, if you want paragraphs numbered 1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1, you need to add Level 1, Level 2, Level 3 etc, all the way to Level 8. This can get tedious, but hang in there!

    From the Number style for this level list, choose the kind of numbering you want for the current level.

    Repeat for each of levels 3 to 9. If you don’t want numbering for a level, leave the ‘Enter formatting for number’ box empty.

    The hard way is to set the ‘Aligned at’, ‘Text indent at’ and ‘Add tab stop at’ boxes individually. Just remember that they’re all measured from the left margin.

    My finished settings look like Figure 5.

    Figure 5: The finished settings in the Modify Multilevel List dialog

    OK, OK back to your document.

    How to apply the Heading styles to your text

    So you have set up your List Style. But we don’t ever use the List Style. Instead, we format paragraphs using the Heading 1, Heading 2 etc paragraph styles. Because you linked the heading paragraph styles to the List Style, the heading styles will now use the numbering you set up in the List Style.

    Applying numbering

    The conductor doesn’t produce any sound: musicians do that. And you won’t find a part for the conductor in the score.

    The list style doesn’t format your text: paragraph styles do that. And you won’t find the list style in the Styles pane.

    Apply your paragraph styles to text. We don’t ever actually use the list style.

    How to apply Heading 1 style to a paragraph

    To apply the numbering to one or more paragraphs in your document:

    How to create a lower-level heading (or: how to demote a heading)

    Figure 6: Use the Increase Indent button to demote a paragraph (ie indent it to the right)

    You can create lower levels of headings by applying the paragraph styles Heading 2, Heading 3 etc. There are lots of ways to apply a paragraph style to your text. Here are three particularly relevant to headings:

    How to edit your numbering scheme

    Your numbering scheme is stored in your Headings list style. It’s not stored in the individual paragraph styles. Therefore:

    Edit the individual paragraph styles if you want to change paragraph settings (eg space before or after) or the font of the text that follows the heading text (eg to make it big or pink or bold). To edit an individual paragraph style, see How to modify styles in Microsoft Word.

    Edit the list style if you want to change the numbers, the position between number and text, the size of the number itself and so on. To edit your list style:

    Figure 7: Choose the Multilevel list menu

    You will see the Headings list style highlighted at the bottom of the menu.

    Is all this really necessary? Can’t I just use the List Library?

    If using the List Library on the Multilevel List menu (see Figure 2 or Figure 8 ) works for you, then go for it! For quick’n’dirty work, it may be just the thing.

    For a corporate template that will be used by hundreds or thousands of users, it’s probably not the best solution. For really big complicated documents, or documents where you have to cut and paste from one document to another a lot, then the List Library may let you down.

    For more information, directly from Microsoft’s Word development team, see [NOTE: outdated links removed by Lene Fredborg 29-Dec-2016] The Many Levels of Lists and Multilevel Lists vs List Styles.

    Too good to be true?

    Related articles on other sites

    And, read from people in Microsoft’s Word development team especially Stuart Stuple’s The Why Behind Our Styles and Lists Designs.

    Related articles on this site

    How to create numbered headings or outline numbering in your Microsoft Word document. How to number headings and figures in Appendixes in Microsoft Word

    Photo info

    Photograph of horn players taken at National Music Camp, Geelong Grammar, January 1993. I have no recollection of why all the horn players were wearing silly hats, but National Music Camp has a fine tradition of encouraging innocent pranks and general merriment-as well as damned hard work-so it’s not entirely surprising. What’s more puzzing is why I kept the photo all these years!

    John Curro, conductor of the Queensland Youth Orchestra who taught me more than I’ll ever know.

    (Archives) Microsoft Word 2007: Creating Headers And Footers

    Last updated

    This article is based on legacy software.

    You can create headers and footers in your Word document so that information such as the author’s name, document title, or page numbers will appear in the top and/or bottom margin of your document. You can create a header and footer that appears the same on every page, or you can customize the pages with different headers and footers.

    Inserting a Header or a Footer

    By default, headers and footers appear on every page of your document. Word gives you have several presets to select from; you can also begin with a blank header or footer.

    Select the desired header or footer style HINT: To start with a blank Header/Footer, selectEdit Header or Edit Footer

    Editing Header or Footer Content

    Once you have inserted a header or footer you can edit or format the content. Additional options appear in the Header & Footer Tools Design Tab.

    Edit text as desired

    From the Ribbon, select additional customizing options as desired

    The Header & Footer Tools Design Tab

    The Header & Footer Tools Design command tab appears on the Ribbon only when an existing header or footer is active. This special command tab providing several unique header and footer formatting options.

    Position Group This group allows you to adjust where your header appears on the page(s). The default setting is 0.5 inches from the top and bottom of the page.

    Close Header and Footer Group From here you can exit the header/footer text box and continue editing your document.

    Creating a Different First Page Header and Footer

    If you want the header/footer of your document to be different on your first page, you first need to create a header or footer. You can customize headers and footers in the Header & Footer Tools Design tab, which appears only when you select a header or footer.

    From the Header & Footer Tools Design command tab, in the Options group, select Different First Page The label on the first page header text box changes from Header to First Page Header.

    In the First Page Header text box, insert the desired information

    In the First Page Footer text box, insert the desired information

    In the Footer text box, insert the desired information

    In the Header text box, insert the desired information

    Creating Odd and Even Page Headers and Footers

    You can create different odd and even page headers and footers, which display different information on the odd and even pages of your document.

    From the Headers & Footers Tools Design tab, in the Options section, select Different Odd & Even Pages

    In the Odd Page Header text box, insert the desired information

    In the Odd Page Footer text box, insert the desired information

    In the Even Page Footer text box, insert the desired information

    In the Even Page Header text box, insert the desired information

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